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Gardening
Gardening
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Your place to ask questions about the best plants to put in your backyard, how to save water and how to grow your garden!

 

Profile photo: Cactus flowers bloom. Photo by Francoise Hradsky

Banner photo: A colorful mix of Texas Rangers, tall grass, a pair of Saguaros, Bird of Paradise in the Santa Cruz Valley.

Discussion

Want to learn more about growing cactus?

The Green Valley Gardeners welcome Mark Sitter, an expert on cactus grown in our region, to share his expertise in a seminar at the Quail Creek Madera Clubhouse on Jan. 24.

Click here to learn more about the seminar.

Are you an avid gardener? Share your gardening tips and photos in the Gardening group.

Discussion

It's not a fern

This familiar
This familiar "Sprengeri" Asparagus Fern has flourished in a large container at The Arid Garden for several years, with very little water and care needed. (Mary Kidnocker photo)

The Asparagus Fern isn't a fern at all. Though it resembles a Victorian Age fern, it is an inedible drought-resistant member of the Lily family related to the edible Asparagus.

University of Arizona Master Gardener Mary Kidnocker describes how to care for the different varieties of this houseplant with green cascading stems.  

Here is some additional information on the Asparagus Fern from The Spruce.

Do you have a houseplant that everyone mistakes for something else?

Discussion

Christmas Cactus care tips

The Christmas Cactus blooms during the cool months but gets the most attention during the holiday season.

University of Arizona Master Gardener Mary Kidnocker describes where the cactus, which is considered a houseplant, originated and explains how to care for it.

This Farmers' Almanac article explains the difference between a Thanksgiving Cactus and a Christmas Cactus. 

Whether you have a Thanksgiving Cactus, a Christmas Cactus, or both, please share your cacti photos with the community.

Discussion

Infamous freeze in 2011 lends valuable information on the cold tolerance of plants in the area.

A badly damaged Monstrosa Cactus at The Arid Garden following an extensive cold spell in February, 2011. Note the vibrant Saguaro in the background. (Mary Kidnocker photo)
A badly damaged Monstrosa Cactus at The Arid Garden following an extensive cold spell in February, 2011. Note the vibrant Saguaro in the background. (Mary Kidnocker photo)

For three nights in a row in February 2011, temperatures that dropped below 20 degrees for 12-hour durations, accompanied by heavy wind gusts, tested the cold hardiness of plants in the area.

Arizona Master Gardener Mary Kidnocker recalls how plants in the area endured the elements in those three nights in 2011, describes ways to determine how cold hardy landscape plants are before you buy them and explains where to plant them to protect them from extreme cold weather.

Do you recall the hard freeze of February 2011, and how did your plants fare?